Did You Know? - Teen Facts

  • Teenagers from the ages of 12-19, especially GIRLS, are the most victimized segment of the population in the United States.
  • The average victim of abduction and murder is an 11-year-old girl, who is described as a "low risk, normal" kid from a middle class neighborhood with a stable family relationship who has initial contact with an abductor within a quarter mile of her home.
  • Teenage girls are among the most frequent victims of sexual assault. Sixty-one percent of all rape victims are younger than 18.
  • Many times things happen and nobody finds out about it because no one wants to talk about it. WHY? Because you are embarrassed and ashamed, feel guilty and betrayed, afraid and mistrustful. If it happens to you, talk about it with an adult you trust. You need to tell, to protect yourself and to protect others that could be victims.
     

What You Need to Know to Get A Driver's License in Georgia

Applying for a Driver's License:
  • Applicant must reside in Georgia and furnish valid residence address. The following items will be accepted as proof of residence: utility bill, bank statement, rental contracts and/or receipts with valid Georgia residence address, employer verification, Georgia license issued to parent, guardian or spouse.
  • Applicant must be 18 years old for classes A, B, and C, 15 years old for class C instructional permit, 16 years old and must have held an instructional permit or license or combination thereof, for one full year for a Class D. A certified copy of the motor vehicle report from the former jurisdiction will be required in order to give credit for a license or permit held in another state.
  • Parental consent is necessary for minors.
  • Click here to visit the Georgia Department of Driver ServicesAll applicants under the age of 18 will be required to show they have completed a course on alcohol and drugs (ADAP). This course will be taught in the Georgia state school system. Instructors will be authorized by the Department of Public Safety.
Your Learner's Permit:
  • You may apply for a regular learnerís permit after your 15th birthday.
  • You may apply for a regular or motorcycle license after your 16th birthday.
  • All applicants under the age of 18 will be required to show they have completed a course on Alcohol and Drug Awareness before they are issued a driverís license. This course will be taught in the Georgia State School System. Instructors will be authorized by the Georgia Department of Public Safety.
  • All applicants under the age of 18 must provide proof that either he/she is currently enrolled in school, has parental permission to withdraw from school, or has received a GED, a high school diploma, or completed high school. Forms for school attendance or withdrawal are available from the local school or Driver License Office.
  • You may apply for a commercial driverís license after age 18.
     

Customizing Your Vehicle and What's Legal

Use Of Colored Lights On Vehicle

Only authorized Law Enforcement vehicles can have colored or flashing lights in use. It is against the law to have flashing blue lights on a vehicle other than an authorized emergency vehicle. Having flashing blue lights on a vehicle can lead to a felony arrest resulting in a find up to $1,000 and five years in prison. The use of strobe lights on a vehicle is not advised. Caution should be used against the use of any flashing/strobe colored lights.

Tag Covers

It is legal to put a cover over your vehicle tag as long as it is clear and does not obstruct any part of the tag. Tinted or colored covers that make it difficult to read a tag are illegal.

Engine Modifications

It is illegal to modify any emission control equipment. Emission control standards should be maintained.
 

Driving is a Privilege - Don't Lose Yours

A student under age 18 may lose his or her driving permit or license for:
 
Dropping Out of School

Not graduating from school without a parent or guardian's permission may be grounds for suspension of driving privileges.

Having Unexcused Absences

Staying out of school for more than 10 consecutive school days in a semester or 2 consecutive quarters can lead to the loss of a permit or license.

Being Suspended From School

A student's privilege to operate a motor vehicle may be suspended, if he or she is suspended from school for: threatening, striking, or harming a teacher, another student, or school personnel; possessing or selling alcohol or other drugs on school property; possessing or using a weapon on school property.

Being Convicted of DUI for the First Time Within a 5-Year Period

Do not Drink and Drive!The driver will lose their license for 1 year. Your driver's license may be reinstated after the Department of Driver Services has held it for 180 days, provided that the driver has completed an approved risk reduction program and pays a reinstatement fee.

Being Convicted of Operating a Vehicle With No Insurance

The driver will lose his or her license for a minimum of 60 days. The license may be reinstated after the Department of Driver Services has held it for 60 days, provided that the driver submits a valid insurance certificate and pays a reinstatement fee.

Being Convicted of Possessing an Illegal Drug

The person will lose his or her driver's license for a period of 180 days for the 1st offense, 3 years for the 2nd offense, and 5 years for the 3rd offense. The person does not need to be operating a motor vehicle at the time of the drug offense to lose his or her license. No permits are available.